In Summary
  • Securing a land title has always been tiresome. Corruption and bureaucracy were the order of the day. So, the government decision to go digital is most welcome because bribery and double allocations – to name but two – will end

Everything is becoming digital. The pace of change has been breathtaking and is accelerating. Gone are the days when people waited for months to secure title deeds. Today, the issuing of land titles is becoming increasingly digital.

Securing a land title has always been tiresome. Corruption and bureaucracy were the order of the day. So, the government decision to go digital is most welcome because bribery and double allocations – to name but two – will end.

The new system will also save time and costs of processing land titles – besides enabling the government to collect tax more easily.

Last Friday, the Minister for Lands, Housing and Human Settlements, Mr William Lukuvi, disclosed that issuing electronic land titles is on the right track.

According to him, the new system will automatically stop double allocation of land titles and allow issuance of 99-year land titles, which cannot be tampered with, as is the case in some areas.

The new technology will ensure that records are stored in a special system that neither land officials nor other authorities can tamper with. This is good news for Tanzanians compelled to bribe corrupt officials for title deeds.

Indeed, it’s a big blow for double-dealing officials – and a gain for ordinary folk. Now, upcountry applicants will no longer have to travel to Dar es Salaam for title deeds.

Although it took the digitalisation long to take off, we nonetheless give the ministry the thumbs up for embracing the technology.

The Integrated Land Management Information System (ILMIS) needs to walk the talk. The new system should be operational countrywide sooner rather than later.

Indeed, ILMIS is experimenting with the new system in Kinondoni and Ubungo in Dar es Salaam Region, and will later move upcountry.

Much as we hail the advent of the new system, the ministry should also ensure that the public is fully aware of it.

STAMP OUT ILLEGAL COSMETICS

It is unsettling to note that business in illegal and unproven cosmetics has been booming in recent years in various parts of the country.

Taking full advantage of human gullibility and widespread ignorance, unscrupulous businesspeople have been marketing soaps and lotions purported to have the capability to greatly increase the size of breasts, hips and buttocks.

Others are touted as the magic cure for potbellies and other physical conditions deemed undesirable. As the Tanzania Drugs and Food Authority (TDFA) has rightly said in the past, the efficacy of these concoctions has not been proven scientifically, thus putting the health and lives of those using them in grave danger.

But while the health of Tanzanians is at risk, traders dealing in the illicit cosmetics are laughing all the way to the bank, and it is not very difficult to see why. People, particularly women, are falling over themselves to buy the cosmetics despite their outrageously high prices.

The TDFA should step up its campaign by using the print and electronic media to educate people on the danger of using such cosmetics.