In Summary
  • This generally describes the phenomenal seasonal changes over a long period resulting from the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This involves changes in regional/global climate patterns that became apparent from the mid-20th century, largely attributed to increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by use of fossil fuels.

The National Environmental Management Council (Nemc) has yet again seen it fit to caution Tanzanians regarding the ominous danger the world faces from seemingly relentless climate change.

This generally describes the phenomenal seasonal changes over a long period resulting from the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This involves changes in regional/global climate patterns that became apparent from the mid-20th century, largely attributed to increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by use of fossil fuels.

Tackling this phenomenon is of utmost importance given the pivotal role that climate plays in the formation and nurturing of natural ecosystems upon which humanity and economies are based and depend for healthy, sustained survival.

It is basically for these reasons that institutions the likes of Nemc in Tanzania are duty and morally bound to constantly remind the relevant authorities – including state governments and their development partners – their obligations in tackling head-on the hydra-headed climate change monster.

That is exactly what Nemc did at a recent climate change seminar for experts which ended with calls upon all and sundry to redouble efforts – including ways and means – to stop climate change in its tragic tracks, and then reverse the trends before it is too late for humanity and other living things.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ANTI-HIV/AIDS CAMPAIGNS?

We hear little about HIV/Aids in Tanzania nowadays, basically because much has been done to bring HIV under control over the last decade. But this should be no reason to rest on our laurels.

UNAIDS statistics show that 1.4 million people were living with the Aids virus in Tanzania in 2016 – an estimated HIV prevalence rate of 4.7 per cent among persons aged 15-49. Also, there were 55,000 new HIV infections the same year, while 33,000 people died from HIV-related illnesses.

These numbers are testimony to the remarkable improvement made in the fight against the malady. But this should not make Tanzanians relax. We should, instead, scale-up the fight against the monster.

Children are at high risk of contracting HIV for various reasons. Number one is ignorance, as children know very little or nothing about the disease. Apart from learning about HIV/Aids in school, they don’t hear much about it elsewhere.

Unfortunately, they rarely see people with full-blown Aids nowadays, what with anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment in place. Unlike during the early days of the pandemic, one can no longer readily tell HIV-positive persons by simply looking at them.

Parents aren’t talking much about HIV/Aids anymore. Even the government and the media have been mum on the malady for some time now. How do we expect young people to know about it and protect themselves from infection? Can we have an HIV-free generation if no one is saying anything about it anymore?

Do young people know how HIV is spread and that it has no cure? Do they know that some of their fellow youths were born with HIV? These are now sexually active and could be infecting their fellow youths knowingly or unknowingly.

Let’s wake up and play our part in saving our young and future generations.